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Clear Stream Avenue News

BOE Congratulates Clear Stream Avenue School on Grant

BOE Congratulates Clear Stream Photo
During the district’s regular board of education on Jan. 28, Superintendent of Schools Dr. Nicholas Stirling and the board recognized building administrators and staff from Clear Stream Avenue School for receiving a $5,000 Lowe’s Toolbox for Education Grant. Principal John Singleton and library media specialist Carolyn Kaiser, applied for the grant this past summer, which will help enhance the school’s MakerSpace.

Dr. Stirling congratulated the school and shared that Clear Stream is the third school in the district to receive this grant. Shaw Avenue School received a Lowe’s Toolbox for Education Grant last school year, while Forest Road School was awarded the grant about two years ago. 

“The grant is intended to build our students knowledge of coding and engineering technology through our MakerSpace,” said Mr. Singleton. “We’re looking to buy electronic educational toys and program kits.” 

Clear Stream Awarded Lowe’s Toolbox for Education Grant

Lowe’s Toolbox for Education Grant Photo
Clear Stream Avenue Elementary School is the recent recipient of a $5,000 Lowe’s Toolbox for Education grant from the Lowe’s Charitable and Educational Foundation. Clear Stream Avenue Principal John Singleton and library media specialist Carolyn Kaiser applied for the fall 2018 grant this past summer, which will help enhance the school’s MakerSpace.

“Studies show that by the time these students graduate college, 40 percent of the jobs that exist today will be obsolete,” said Mr. Singleton. “This means it’s important to start getting students interested in coding, technology and science so that they are able to enter the workforce upon graduation.”

The school looks to incorporate new science, technology, engineering and mathematics kits into the school’s MakerSpace to create more engaging activities for students to explore. According to Mr. Singleton, the grant will help continue to capture creativity, collaboration, communication and critical thinking.
 
Items of interest include purchasing master electricity labs, advanced circuitry kits, alternative energy kits and more building kits for the younger grade levels. With these additions to the MakerSpace, students can continue to think outside of the box and grow into 21st century learners – one of the district’s goals. 

Clear Stream Students Create a Patch of History

Clear Stream Students Create a Patch of History Photo 1
Clear Stream Students Create a Patch of History Photo 2
Clear Stream Students Create a Patch of History Photo 3
Clear Stream Students Create a Patch of History Photo 4
Clear Stream Students Create a Patch of History Photo 5
Clear Stream Students Create a Patch of History Photo 6
As part of their history lesson, fourth-graders at Clear Stream Avenue Elementary School participated in a Freedom Quilts workshop with the help of Jennifer Henriquez, outreach manager at the Long Island Children’s Museum, on Jan. 18. Ms. Henriquez spoke about freedom quilts, which were used during the Underground Railroad to help enslaved Africans escape to freedom. Students learned more about the difficult lives of the enslaved Africans and the different quilt patterns which represented specific directions to help them reach freedom.

After learning about the secret system, each student created their own quilt patterns with the help of Ms. Henriquez. Using a template of the North Star and Flying Geese, two quilt patterns from that time in history, students selected their favorite fabrics and glued pieces onto their template. At the end of the activity, Ms. Henriquez provided each student with a free pass to the Long Island Children’s Museum.
 
Each fourth-grade class continued their lesson back in the classroom by watching a video on Scholastic BookFlix about the Underground Railroad.
 
“There is a misconception that enslaved Africans were uneducated, but in fact they were very intelligent to come up with these Freedom Quilts that could give them directions on how to escape to freedom,” said Principal John Singleton. “I’m very proud that our students are still learning about slavery and their quest to freedom.” 

Home for the Holidays

Home for the Holidays Photo 1
Home for the Holidays Photo 2
Clear Stream Avenue School sixth-grader Zuri Cameron received the surprise of her life when her father, United States Army Staff Sergeant Charles Cameron, popped into her classroom before the holiday recess, returning from a year-long deployment. Zuri knew her father would be coming home later that day but the last thing she expected was to see him walk into her classroom during a lesson. She screamed in delight and immediately jumped into her father’s arms. 

“It was exciting,” said Zuri. “It was nice to be able to see him because I haven’t seen him since last year.” 

The much anticipated reunion was just as exciting and memorable for Mr. Cameron, who has served in the army for the past 16 years. 

“It felt amazing,” he said. “I even cried a little bit. It was definitely a blessing and perfect to be able to see her.” 

Overjoyed at the reunion and as a way to thank Mr. Cameron for his service, Clear Stream Avenue School Principal John Singleton picked up a special lunch for the two and together, Zuri and her father were able to catch up and enjoy their meal during Zuri’s lunch period. 

Thank you, Mr. Cameron for your service! 

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